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How To Burglar-Proof Your Windows

Many burglars enter homes by simply breaking glass windows. A good deterrent is to have better quality glass installed at vulnerable points around the perimeter of your residence. Most burglars avoid attempting to break the following types of glass due to the fear of attracting attention:

LAMINATED GLASS is made by a vinyl or plastic interlayer sandwiched between two layers of glass. This type of glass adds additional strength to your windows. To gain entry, a burglar would have to strike the glass repeatedly in the same spot in order to make a small opening. Most burglars are reluctant to create this type of noise for fear of being detected.

TEMPERED GLASS is made by placing a piece of regular glass in an oven, bringing it almost to the melting point, and then chilling it rapidly. This causes a skin to form around the glass. Fully tempered glass is four to five times stronger than regular glass.

WIRED GLASS adds the benefit of a visible deterrent. Extra effort will be needed to break the glass and then cut through the wire located within the glass, in order to gain entry.

PLASTICS: Plastic material is divided into two types : acrylic or polycarbonate. The acrylics are more than ten times stronger than glass of the same thickness and are commonly called plexiglass. Polycarbonate sheets are superior to acrylics and are advertised as 250 times more impact resistant than safety glass, and 20 more times than other transparent plastic.

With SLIDING WINDOWS the primary objective is to keep the window from sliding or being lifted up and out of the track. There are many manufactured products available for securing windows. Here are some of the suggestions:

PINNED WINDOW ANTI-SLIDE BLOCK SLIDEBOLT: It is not recommended that you lock a window in a ventilated position. This is an invitation to a prying action which can result in entry. Key locking devices offer no real security, and they can be a fire exit hazard.

CASEMENT WINDOWS are the simplest to secure. Make sure the latch works properly and that the "operator" has no excess play. If so, replace the worn hardware.

DOUBLE HUNG WINDOW latches may be jimmied open. If a window is not used, screw it shut (except bedrooms). For windows in use, drill a sloping hole into the top of the bottom window, through and into the bottom of the top window, and insert an easily removable pin or nail.

LOUVRE WINDOWS are bad security risks. Remove and replace with solid glass or other type of ventilating window. Or protect with a grate or grille (except bedrooms).

WARNING: One window in every bedroom on the ground and second floor must be left available as a fire exit, particularly for children and guests in your home. At night, the bedroom window may often be the quickest and safest means of getting out. Because of the danger of fire, decorative grilles are not recommended on bedroom windows.


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